Repatriation – Atlantic Storm http://atlantic-storm.org/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 09:16:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://atlantic-storm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Repatriation – Atlantic Storm http://atlantic-storm.org/ 32 32 Children abandoned by their parents during an immigration raid in Segambut Dalam https://atlantic-storm.org/children-abandoned-by-their-parents-during-an-immigration-raid-in-segambut-dalam/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 09:16:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/children-abandoned-by-their-parents-during-an-immigration-raid-in-segambut-dalam/

KUALA LUMPUR: Two children, aged one and six, were abandoned by their parents following an early morning raid by the immigration service.

The parents, believed to be Indonesians, were nowhere to be found during the 1.30am raid on a squatter encampment at Kampung Masjid, Segambut Dalam on Friday July 1.

The tragic situation was part of the situation during the raid, after the repatriation recalibration program for undocumented migrants expired.

Kuala Lumpur Immigration Department Director Shamsul Badrin Mohshin said department staff inspected 92 Indonesians and Bangladeshis in the village.

“We discovered that 76 people had committed various immigration offences, including 46 men and 23 women, as well as seven children.

“Among the offenses are possession of valid travel documents and exceeding the length of stay,” he told reporters after Friday’s raid.

Syamsul Badrin said undocumented foreigners had various tactics to avoid department action, including escaping barefoot in forested areas.

“As we can see right now, they even abandoned their children to escape. We will place officers at the house until the parents return,” he said.

Kuala Lumpur Immigration will continue to raid areas full of undocumented foreigners, especially residential areas, factories and shopping malls in the city to detect those who have not participated in the repatriation program. , did he declare.

“We will not compromise by taking action in accordance with the Immigration Act.

“The Home Office has given them (undocumented foreigners) since November 2020 to participate in the repatriation program, but some are still stubborn,” he said.

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World cannot fail to repatriate Rohingyas to Myanmar from Bangladesh – OpEd – Eurasia Review https://atlantic-storm.org/world-cannot-fail-to-repatriate-rohingyas-to-myanmar-from-bangladesh-oped-eurasia-review/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 00:39:20 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/world-cannot-fail-to-repatriate-rohingyas-to-myanmar-from-bangladesh-oped-eurasia-review/

Five years after the largest influx of Rohingya refugees into camps in Bangladesh, there has been little progress in the bilateral effort with Myanmar to send them back to their homelands. Since none of the 1.1 million Rohingya could be brought back under the initiative taken by the two neighbors in 2018, Bangladesh has repeatedly requested assistance from the international community, including the UN.

The authorities in Bangladesh believe that the situation of the Rohingya refugees can be resolved through their safe, dignified, voluntary and long-term return to Rakhine, Myanmar, where they were born and raised. Although more than 600,000 Rohingya have fled the violence of Myanmar’s security forces to take refuge in Bangladesh since August 2017, adding to the 350,000 who have already lived here since the late 1970s and are currently protected in camps in Cox’s Bazar and on the island of Bhasan Char, their repatriation has made little progress. The birth of 120,000 children, according to the Minister of State for Disaster Management and Relief, led to an increase in the number of Rohingya in Bangladesh after the 2017 influx.

In order to raise awareness and lobby for their demands, which include their immediate repatriation, the application of the global political commitment of the responsibility to protect before their repatriation and the repeal of the Citizenship Act of 1982 in Myanmar, the Rohingyas have recently launched a drive home campaign in the Cox’s Bazar camps. The Rohingya protest for World Refugee Day was the largest since 2019, when more than 100,000 Rohingyas turned out for a program to demand accountability for atrocities against them and a safe return home.

The failure of Rohingya repatriation efforts has been widely attributed to the Myanmar government’s refusal to establish conditions in Rakhine that would encourage their voluntary and sustainable return.

As the Myanmar government continued to instill terror in Rakhine State in an effort to block and, it seems, avert the process, bilateral efforts to repatriate the Rohingyas have rarely been successful. And not a single Rohingya could be returned to Rakhine because they would not return without assurances of their safety and citizenship. Bangladesh has registered 876,000 Rohingya for repatriation, but only 35,000 of them have had their identity confirmed by Myanmar, and the country has not indicated when the repatriation process will begin.

Although bilateral efforts have failed, regional, global and international fora – including the United Nations and its refugee agency – have also failed on the Rohingya by not exerting enough pressure on Myanmar to accept the Rohingya in a dignified and secure manner. The drive home campaign was launched by Rohingya living in Kutupalong and Teknaf camps in Cox’s Bazar because they believed the UN and international community had not done enough to pressure the authorities in the country. Myanmar to grant them their citizenship rights and repatriate them. their. Like the Bangladeshi government, the Rohingya believe their repatriation is the only way to end their agony.

During previous Rohingya influxes into Bangladesh in the 1970s and 1990s, and their voluntary repatriation by Myanmar through agreements and understandings with Bangladesh, Myanmar took them back because they were then subject to Western sanctions, which is no longer the case today.

The UK and other Western countries continue to make significant investments in Myanmar despite evidence of the country’s persecution of Rohingya and ICJ rulings upholding their justice (International Court of Justice).

The world, including the UK, must pressure the Myanmar government to return its Rohingya citizens, as it has invested $2.5 billion in Myanmar over the past three years and has more than 500 million dollars in bilateral trade.

The world should step up pressure on Myanmar for the immediate repatriation of Rohingya from Bangladesh as it cannot continue to bear the burden of 1.1 million displaced Burmese nationals. World leaders must pressure Myanmar to bring back its nationals, the persecuted Rohingya who fled a military crackdown to seek refuge in Bangladesh. Bangladesh cannot solve the problem [Rohingya] only problem, and the international community should put more pressure on Myanmar to solve it.

Dieng stressed the need for a peaceful repatriation of Rohingyas with the dignity and safety necessary for a permanent solution to the crisis.

The global community, which seems more concerned about refugees and the displacement of populations from western countries, and regional forums, which seem passive in resolving the Rohingya crisis, must step up their efforts and ensure that the issue of Rohingya repatriation equal attention as bilateral attempts to repatriate the Rohingya, considered the most persecuted community in the world, must continue.

Dr Arpita Hazarika is a researcher based at Gauhati University, Assam, India. She has a keen interest in refugee affairs, political economy, security and strategic affairs, foreign policy in the Asia-Pacific region. She has visited a number of countries such as Bangladesh, Myanmar, China, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, UK, USA, France, Japan, Australia, Thailand , Singapore and Canada. She has research work on India-Bangladesh affairs.

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ABCON aims to improve local production and economic diversification https://atlantic-storm.org/abcon-aims-to-improve-local-production-and-economic-diversification/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 10:33:48 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/abcon-aims-to-improve-local-production-and-economic-diversification/

Chairman of the Association of Bureaux De Change Operators of Nigeria (ABCON), Aminu Gwadabe called for improving local production and diversifying the oil economy to keep the Nigerian economy in high Naira volatility.

Gwadabe decried that despite foreign exchange interventions by the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), the volatility of the naira is compounded by rising inflation, rising interest rates and slow economic growth, with implications for middle and low incomes.

Speaking in Lagos over the weekend, Gwadabe said the ongoing scenarios increased the risk of stagflation with potentially damaging consequences for the poor within the economy.

He said global growth is already expected to fall from 5.7% in 2021 to 2.9% in 2022, significantly lower than the 4.1% forecast by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in January.

Gwadabe said naira trading at 614 naira/$1 on the parallel market, dollar bids continue to rise as inflation hit an 11-month high (17.71%) in May.

These events, the ABCON boss said, are eroding household purchasing power. “The main driver of inflation is the stubborn rise in food inflation. The average price level of the food basket increased by 1.13% to 19.50% in May against 18.37% in April. This can be reversed by increased support for agriculture and government policies that support the sector,” he said.

Gwadabe said Nigeria’s huge diaspora population and market, which attracts an average of $20 billion a year, can be tapped to deepen dollar inflows into the economy.

He said expanding dollar receipt points through more than 5,000 currency exchange operators can deepen dollar inflows and significantly increase Nigeria’s foreign exchange position.

Gwadabe said that globally, CDBs remain one of the channels through which diaspora funds enter countries.

He said that the BDCs remain at the center of economic development and have the ability to attract the capital necessary for the development of the Nigerian economy and the deepening of the foreign exchange market.

ABCON believes that the success of the BDCs will be boosted by access to multiple streams of foreign exchange revenue to deepen the market, maintain the stability of the naira and boost the operations of the BDCs.

“Making BDCs one of the channels through which more than $20 billion in annual diaspora remittances enter the economy will provide depth to the foreign exchange market and boost BDC operations. Nigerian CDB operators have also identified with the immense opportunities presented by diaspora remittances and want to play a greater role in attracting more foreign capital into the economy. This is because remittances are known to help the poorest recipients meet their basic needs, finance cash and non-cash investments, fund education, foster new businesses, repay debt and, essentially, to stimulate economic growth,” said Gwadabe.

In addition, Gwadabe said the effective implementation of the “RT200 FX program”, which stands for the apex bank’s “race to $200 billion in foreign exchange repatriation” policy announced in February, will boost foreign exchange inflows into the the economy.

He said the program is a set of policies, plans and programs for non-oil exports that will enable Nigeria to achieve its ambitious but achievable target of $200 billion in foreign exchange repatriation exclusively from exports. non-oil, over the next three to five years.

Gwadabe said the RT200 FX program is one of the strategies that can help Nigeria gain more stable and sustainable currency inflows.

He said that although the CBN has recently shown greater commitment to fighting inflation by raising the monetary policy rate (MPR) by 150 basis points to 13% per annum, the strengthening of the economy through local production will reverse the negative trends in the economy.

He explained that with the inflation rate remaining higher than interest rates, investment returns will fall and foreign capital inflows will fall, resulting in sluggish economic growth.

Gwadabe said other advanced economies, including the United States, are also fighting inflation with higher interest rates.

The US Federal Reserve maintained its monetary policy tightening stance, raising interest rates by 75 basis points to 1.75% to contain inflation. This is the third rate hike this year and the biggest since 1994.

He said rising US interest rates would reduce capital inflows to Nigeria and other developing markets, noting that the US was the third largest source of capital imports to Nigeria in the first quarter of 2022. , representing 5.22% of total capital imports.

In conclusion, Gwadabe urged the CBN to liberalize the foreign exchange market, ensure that paradigms shift from demand measures to supply measures, support SME infrastructure/joint venture financing, promote awareness to the skills of operators, to ensure more collaborations between stakeholders and to develop policies favorable to the industry for the good of the economy.

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Elgin Marbles ‘deal’ unlikely as Greece wary of ‘legal trap’ https://atlantic-storm.org/elgin-marbles-deal-unlikely-as-greece-wary-of-legal-trap/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 16:44:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/elgin-marbles-deal-unlikely-as-greece-wary-of-legal-trap/

News of the standoff comes after Mr Osborne said last week that the two sides needed to drop their ‘preconditions’ and ‘red lines’ in order to reach a ‘sensitive’ agreement on the future of the works. ancient arts.

But the suggestion was seen as a ploy by those campaigning for the return of the sculptures that once adorned the Parthenon, with famed Cambridge classicist Professor Paul Cartledge – of the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles – accusing M Osborne to engage in “misappropriation and misinformation”.

Marlen Taffarello Godwin, a member of the committee, said: “If George Osborne really hopes to open a discussion to negotiate an agreement, ‘without any red lines’, that should include the question of ownership of the British Museum.”

The museum has argued that it is the rightful owner of the statues, which it holds in its collection by law on behalf of the British public – thus forcing politicians to change legislation to free the ancient sculptures.

The UK government has insisted that the future of the statues is not the business of politicians but of the British Museum, while saying no changes to legislation are planned.

The two positions have led to an impasse which Unesco has tried to resolve, with talks brokered by the UN cultural body having recently been organized between Greece and the United Kingdom in order to settle the dispute.

However, the British government has distanced itself from the talks, saying the disputed sculptures will not be up for discussion at talks convened to discuss them, a position campaigners for the repatriation of the Marbles told the Telegraph that it was “wacky “.

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Indian Embassy in US says it is in contact with Sai Charan’s family to facilitate speedy repatriation of mortal remains https://atlantic-storm.org/indian-embassy-in-us-says-it-is-in-contact-with-sai-charans-family-to-facilitate-speedy-repatriation-of-mortal-remains/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 01:59:53 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/indian-embassy-in-us-says-it-is-in-contact-with-sai-charans-family-to-facilitate-speedy-repatriation-of-mortal-remains/

The Indian Embassy in the United States said it was in close contact with the family of Nakka Sai Charan to facilitate the speedy repatriation of his remains. He was pronounced dead after being shot in the head.

Nakka Sai Charan was found with gunshot wounds in Maryland. (File photo)

The Indian Embassy in the United States said on Thursday it was in close contact with the family of Nakka Sai Charan to facilitate the speedy repatriation of the remains of the 25-year-old man from Telangana who was declared died after apparently being shot in the head in Maryland.

Sai Charan was found injured with an apparent gunshot wound inside a silver Hyundai Tucson SUV in Baltimore, Maryland. He was immediately rushed to a trauma center, where he was pronounced dead, local media reported Monday.

“We learned of the unfortunate death of Nakka Sai Charan in the early morning hours of Sunday, June 19, 2022 in Baltimore, Maryland. Baltimore police have yet to release further details about the circumstances of the death as the investigation is ongoing. course,” the Indian embassy here said in a brief statement.

The embassy is in close contact with the victim’s family and members of the diaspora to facilitate the speedy repatriation of Sai Charan’s mortal remains, the statement added.

Sai Charan’s family resides in the town of Nalgonda in Telangana.

His father N Narasimha said his son flew to the United States in August 2020.

After completing his MS course, he had been working in Maryland for six months. Narasimha had spoken to her son on Friday.

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Sudanese museum officials call on UK to return looted cultural artefacts, including two human skulls https://atlantic-storm.org/sudanese-museum-officials-call-on-uk-to-return-looted-cultural-artefacts-including-two-human-skulls/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:59:54 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/sudanese-museum-officials-call-on-uk-to-return-looted-cultural-artefacts-including-two-human-skulls/

Sudan museum officials are calling for the repatriation of cultural artefacts and human remains that were stolen by British soldiers and other colonizers in the late 19th century.

Many of the items in question were taken as trophies after the Battle of Omdurman in 1898, when British and Egyptian forces used advanced equipment, including artillery and machine guns, to crush their Sudanese opponents. This treasure included clothing and armor currently held in the Royal Armories collection and a banner now belonging to the Palace Green Library at Durham University. The most controversial items requested are two skulls taken from the battlefield by explorers Reginald Koettlitz and Henry Wellcome and now kept in Edinburgh’s Anatomical Museum.

Speaking about the importance of their return, National Society of Antiquities and Museums (NCAM) Director of Conservation Eglal el-Malik told the Guardian, “These people are our brothers, our heroes. They united and defended our country. It is a very particular story of resistance to imperialism. Their descendants should see it all here.

Officials have proposed that the items, once returned, be displayed at Khalifa House in Omdurman, a community museum that already has several rooms dedicated to the battle. It is due to reopen soon, after a period of restoration funded by a British Council grant.

The Museum of Anatomy has not yet received a formal request for the return of the skulls, according to the Guardian. A spokesperson for Durham University told Artnet News that they are already working closely with NCAM to fulfill several loan requests, but have not yet received any requests for the banner in question. .

El-Malik also said the UK institutions she worked with were “very helpful overall” and said there were security issues that needed to be resolved before items could be safely returned. “The reality is that we have so many difficulties [in Sudan]”, she said. “It would be great if we had all these things now, but [they are] in a good situation where [they are] and so many people see [them]. So you have to be reasonable. »

This latest appeal comes amid a growing wave of restitution demands from Britain and Europe, as repatriation becomes a major consideration for the future of museum collections. One of the longest-running debates has been over whether the UK should return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece, the subject of a protest outside the British Museum over the weekend. Museum president George Osborne suggested earlier this month that the two countries could potentially share custody of the priceless marbles.

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Want to stay one step ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to receive breaking news, revealing interviews and incisive reviews that move the conversation forward. ]]> Stateless refugees and the calculation of human worth: Daily Star contributor https://atlantic-storm.org/stateless-refugees-and-the-calculation-of-human-worth-daily-star-contributor/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 03:25:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/stateless-refugees-and-the-calculation-of-human-worth-daily-star-contributor/

DHAKA (THE DAILY STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) – We depend on oversimplified narratives to help us come to terms with our existence.

That we are the most developed living organism on Earth. That it is the result of a linear evolution from the most simple and insensitive single-celled amoeba to the intelligent and cultured beings that we are now. May this linear progress continue as societies become more advanced and sophisticated.

And we believe in our modern global political system of nation states. But we pledge our allegiance to our country and we feel compelled to be faithful to the sinuous lines that define it. We do not know how arbitrarily this boundary was drawn.

Admittedly, this border is an undeniable truth, an irreversible sleight of hand in history. But this simple, clean narrative of belonging grossly complicates our humanity. This leaves long, complex equations in a murky calculation determining which lives matter and how many.

It starts quite simply: ours above the rest. Our State will value its citizens, its language, its heritage, etc. above any other citizen, language or heritage. The dignity and rights of each person are protected by the State of which he is a citizen.

But no country is homogeneous, and nationalist sentiment must make choices and compromises. The constitution privileges all citizens regardless of the language they speak – but clearly positions Bengali as the state language, not Kokborok or Hajong (“Coke Studio Bangla” notwithstanding).

Then there are citizens whose ancestors are outright immigrants. Foreigners with a Bangladeshi passport. The value of this breed does not depend on any variable. Melanin, for example, appears to be inversely proportional to value. The level of exoticism of their origin is directly related to their value. If they speak the “enemy language”, Urdu, their value is automatically negative.

Then there is religion. Islam has a special place in our state and our constitution, and even that is a little awkward for anyone who is not a Muslim. But Muslims receive a lot of criticism elsewhere in the world. You add a little to one side of the equation, subtract a little to the other, and it all balances out, right? Positive humanity versus negative humanity. And let’s not forget money and influence. These are the most important determinants of a person’s worth.

Then there are… well, aliens. The ‘forcibly displaced’, rendered stateless by a genocidal regime, with no winding lines to safely call their own, thus constantly seeking temporary refuge within ours. What value do we place on their life, as opposed to our own? And how is this value calculated? And who is responsible for appreciating it? Should it be the “first come” country? But then what responsibility does the global community have?

Yes, the calculation of human worth gets super convoluted as soon as we start talking about stateless refugees. Take the Rohingya people, whom Bangladesh has been absorbing for decades. Many Rohingya who arrived as early as the 1970s have been naturalized.

And then there were those who crossed the border as they pleased – after all, it was only a river that had to be crossed – and who never bothered to do the paperwork. So now we have more variables in our equation: who arrived when, and who has what papers.

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DVIDS – News – US Delegations and RMI Begin Negotiations for Kwajalein Atoll Agreement https://atlantic-storm.org/dvids-news-us-delegations-and-rmi-begin-negotiations-for-kwajalein-atoll-agreement/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 06:23:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/dvids-news-us-delegations-and-rmi-begin-negotiations-for-kwajalein-atoll-agreement/

Delegations from the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands safely completed the first round of negotiations for the Compact of Free Association, a set of provisions governing financial, defense and economic agreements between the two nations, after the arrival of U.S. team and RMI members at Bucholz Army Airfield on Tuesday, June 14, 2022.

US Ambassador to the IRM Roxanne Cabral and USAG-KA Commander Col. Tom Pugsley hosted Ambassador Special Envoy of the US President and Chief of the Negotiating Team Joseph Yun. Traveling with Yun were members of the US delegation representing the Department of the Interior, the US Indo-Pacific Command and the US State Department.

All team members tested negative for COVID-19 upon arrival and remained isolated from the USAG-KA community during their visit for community health and safety. Visitors underwent a routine medical screening at BAAF before being isolated at Kwaj Lodge, an island facility used for repatriation.

After months of delays extended by COVID-19 protocols and ensuing health and travel restrictions, the delegations had their first meeting at Kwajalein High School’s Davye Davis Multipurpose Hall the same afternoon.

After the introductions, the RMI delegation’s chief negotiator and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Kitlang Kabua, greeted the members of the US delegation with special welcome gifts. Traditionally handcrafted items were laid in American cutlery. Due to the strict rules of the meeting, the gifts could not be delivered in person, as is the custom.

During the three days of discussions, the two teams explored topics of common interest before the adjournment. The dates for the second round of talks will be announced later.

Hosting negotiations was made possible on USAG-KA through the execution of a strict “travel bubble” and adherence to active garrison quarantine protocols. Additional preparations in the meeting area allowed the two groups to interact safely. The conference-style arrangement used airy spaces between delegation seats to accommodate social distancing and included “breakout” discussion areas separated by acrylic screens.

Since RMI travel restrictions were instituted in 2020, similar “bubble” operations have been used to safely accommodate the movements of search and rescue teams and the activities of the Criminal Investigations Division.

During the meetings, the entire school was cordoned off from the local community and specially provided with personal protective equipment until the proceedings adjourned on June 16. Following decontamination, the establishment will be accessible but will remain closed until the start of the school year.

Minister Kabua joined the RMI COFA negotiating team in 2020. She previously served the RMI government as Minister of Sports, Education and Training, and was elected to the Nitijela, the Marshallese legislature, in 2019.

Ambassador Yun, whose former diplomatic assignments included serving as Ambassador to Malaysia, served more than 33 years in the US Foreign Service. Some of his career highlights include service as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs at the Department of State and as United States Special Representative for North Korean politics. Yun was appointed special envoy to the US president for the pact negotiations by US President Joe Biden in March.

COFA was signed into federal law after it was formally passed by the U.S. Congress in October 1986 and last renewed in 2003. In recent years, the agreement has come up in discussions about health care, the education and marshal land use. Its provisions include Marshallese access to U.S. national programs and other citizen services, disaster management assistance resources, and continued use of the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site.

In a March press release, US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken described the United States’ relationship with the compact Indo-Pacific nations as “special and longstanding.”

“The compacts reflect the close relationship between the United States and the freely associated states and are an essential source of regional security, stability, and prosperity. Through these negotiations, we will strengthen our enduring partnerships with our close Pacific island partners and ensure a free, open and prosperous Indo-Pacific region.







Date taken: 18.06.2022
Date posted: 18.06.2022 02:23
Story ID: 423326
Location: MH





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DC Trolls Saudi Embassy by Naming Street Jamal Khashoggi Way – NBC New York https://atlantic-storm.org/dc-trolls-saudi-embassy-by-naming-street-jamal-khashoggi-way-nbc-new-york/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 01:47:03 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/dc-trolls-saudi-embassy-by-naming-street-jamal-khashoggi-way-nbc-new-york/

A month before President Joe Biden’s trip to Saudi Arabia, the District of Columbia is renaming the street outside the Saudi Embassy Jamal Khashoggi Way, trolling Riyadh for its role in the 2018 killing of the Saudi dissident activist and journalist.

In the presence of members of the DC Council, a Jamal Khashoggi Way sign was unveiled directly in front of the Embassy’s main entrance.

“We intend to remind the people behind these doors … that we hold them accountable and we will hold them accountable for the murder of our friend,” said Sarah Leah Whitson, executive director of DAWN, the pro-Arab world. democratic organization founded by Khashoggi before his death.

Whitson also criticized what she called the “brazen capitulation” of the Biden administration for seeking to improve relations with the Saudi government and scheduling an official presidential visit to the kingdom.

Khashoggi, a prominent Saudi journalist and Washington Post columnist, entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2, 2018, seeking the necessary documentation for a planned wedding with his fiancee waiting for him outside. The 59-year-old never emerged.

The Saudi government initially denied any wrongdoing. But under mounting international pressure, Riyadh finally admitted Khashoggi was killed inside the consulate in what the Saudis said was a repatriation effort gone awry. The CIA then released a report concluding that Khashoggi had been killed and dismembered on the orders of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman.

The Saudi regime has always denied this link. Several lower-ranking Saudi officials and agents have been sentenced to prison terms for the murder.

The DC Council voted unanimously late last year to rename a section of a block for Khashoggi.

“I’m very proud that we did this,” DC Board Chairman Phil Mendelson said. “The Saudi government cannot forget what happened, what it did. It is a constant reminder.

The name change is ceremonial, as indicated by the brown road sign instead of the usual green, and it will not impact the Embassy’s mailing address. But the sign will remain indefinitely. An email to the Saudi Embassy seeking comment was not answered.

Khashoggi’s Turkish fiancée, Hatice Cengiz, was unable to attend the ceremony, but a statement from her was read aloud.

In it, she bitterly criticized the Biden administration for “smoothing principle and opportunity over principle.”

Cengiz also directly asked Biden, during his meeting with the Crown Prince, “Can you at least ask, ‘Where is Jamal’s body?'”

Karine Jean Pierre, the White House press secretary, did not say whether Biden would raise the issue of Khashoggi’s murder when he meets with Bin Salman next month.

“The president is a maverick. It’s not something he’s afraid to talk about,” she said. But she did not confirm whether the murder would be a topic of conversation.

The DC government has a history of such public moves to troll or shame foreign governments. In February 2018, the street in front of the Russian Embassy was named Boris Nemtsov Plaza, after a Russian activist was shot while walking on a bridge near the Kremlin in 2015.

On the former site of the Russian Embassy, ​​a street has been renamed in honor of longtime Russian dissident Andrei Sakharov.

Wednesday’s street name change was essentially a formalization of a campaign by independent activists that had been going on for years. Shortly after Khashoggi’s death, local activist Claude Taylor began placing realistic Jamal Khashoggi street signs throughout the city, including outside the embassy. Taylor said he had as many as 10 signs in different locations at one time, including one near Dupont Circle that stood for two years before it was vandalized.

“It’s just a form of public protest with a performance art aspect to it,” Taylor said.

Although he noted with a laugh that he wasn’t invited to Wednesday’s ceremony, Taylor said, “I’m glad the city did the right thing and I’m glad he’s being recognized. in this way.”

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Associated Press writer Chris Megerian contributed to this report.

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“Making science a cornerstone” of rebuilt Ukraine https://atlantic-storm.org/making-science-a-cornerstone-of-rebuilt-ukraine/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 14:37:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/making-science-a-cornerstone-of-rebuilt-ukraine/

New funding programs to support early-career researchers, cross-appointments with Western universities and infrastructure replacement must be at the heart of a post-war plan to revive Europe’s ailing research system. Ukraine, leading scientific organizations said.

In a letter signed by representatives of national science academies in the United States and several European countries, agreed following a meeting in Warsaw earlier this month, world leaders are urged to develop grants and programs to support the “reconstruction of a modern and integrated science and science on a global scale”. research system.

« Rebuilding science and research in Ukraine [will be] essential to ensure its long-term prosperity and sovereignty,” said the letterwhich is signed by the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, the Royal Society of the United Kingdom and similar organizations in Germany, Poland, Denmark and Poland.

Among the “practical steps” outlined in a 10-point plan are “specific funding programs for early career Ukrainian researchers and their teams, including those using remote working arrangements,” and “establishing[ing] fund joint research programs by international teams with researchers working in Ukraine and provide for joint appointments”.

The plan calls on Western universities to allow displaced Ukrainian scholars to “maintain their institutional affiliations in Ukraine.” [when] to receive temporary appointments abroad, in order to encourage repatriation once hostilities cease and the general situation improves”.

It asks European and American universities to “provide access to specialized research facilities abroad, in particular those that replicate Ukrainian facilities damaged or destroyed during the hostilities”, as well as to “donate laboratory equipment and essential and still usable research to Ukrainian institutions to replace the capacities destroyed during the war”.

The letter also asks publishers to waive article processing fees for Ukrainian scholars, as well as to provide free access to journals to institutions in Ukraine, which some journal providers have already implemented. Meanwhile, scientific organizations are urged to waive membership dues and conference attendance fees.

More broadly, the academics call on institutions to “establish brain circulation measures for Ukrainian researchers for networking and mutual learning with colleagues and organizations in the international scientific community.”

They also call for the creation of a “coordinating council to maximize impacts, minimize redundancies and meaningfully use synergies, taking into account issues related to junior and senior researchers”.

write in ScienceJerzy Duszyński, who heads the Polish National Academy of Sciences, Marcia McNutt of the US National Academy of Sciences, and Anatoliy Zagorodny, president of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, explain how the Russian invasion had, in many cases, deliberately sought “to destroy the nation’s scientific institutions and infrastructure, signaling Russia’s intent to destroy Ukraine’s future”.

“It is vital that science be the cornerstone of any reconstruction of Ukraine after the war,” they add, stating that “the reconstruction of Ukrainian science should not focus on reproducing what has been lost , but on equipping the country’s scientific enterprise to meet common 21st century challenges — such as preparing for future pandemics, tackling climate change, and sharing the benefits of science fairly and equitably.

New funding programs to support early-career researchers, cross-appointments with Western universities and infrastructure replacement must be at the heart of a post-war plan to revive Europe’s ailing research system. Ukraine, leading scientific organizations said.

In a letter signed by representatives of national science academies in the United States and several European countries, agreed following a meeting in Warsaw earlier this month, world leaders are urged to develop grants and programs to support the “reconstruction of a modern and integrated science and science on a global scale”. research system.

« Rebuilding science and research in Ukraine [will be] essential to ensure its long-term prosperity and sovereignty,” said the letterwhich is signed by the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, the Royal Society of the United Kingdom and similar organizations in Germany, Poland, Denmark and Poland.

Among the “practical steps” outlined in a 10-point plan are “specific funding programs for early career Ukrainian researchers and their teams, including those using remote working arrangements,” and “establishing[ing] fund joint research programs by international teams with researchers working in Ukraine and provide for joint appointments”.

The plan calls on Western universities to allow displaced Ukrainian scholars to “maintain their institutional affiliations in Ukraine.” [when] to receive temporary appointments abroad, in order to encourage repatriation once hostilities cease and the general situation improves”.

It asks European and American universities to “provide access to specialized research facilities abroad, in particular those that replicate Ukrainian facilities damaged or destroyed during the hostilities”, as well as to “donate laboratory equipment and essential and still usable research to Ukrainian institutions to replace the capacities destroyed during the war”.

The letter also asks publishers to waive article processing fees for Ukrainian scholars, as well as to provide free access to journals to institutions in Ukraine, which some journal providers have already implemented. Meanwhile, scientific organizations are urged to waive membership dues and conference attendance fees.

More broadly, the academics call on institutions to “establish brain circulation measures for Ukrainian researchers for networking and mutual learning with colleagues and organizations in the international scientific community.”

They also call for the creation of a “coordinating council to maximize impacts, minimize redundancies and meaningfully use synergies, taking into account issues related to junior and senior researchers”.

write in ScienceJerzy Duszyński, who heads the Polish National Academy of Sciences, Marcia McNutt of the US National Academy of Sciences, and Anatoliy Zagorodny, president of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, explain how the Russian invasion had, in many cases, deliberately sought “to destroy the nation’s scientific institutions and infrastructure, signaling Russia’s intent to destroy Ukraine’s future”.

“It is vital that science be the cornerstone of any reconstruction of Ukraine after the war,” they add, stating that “the reconstruction of Ukrainian science should not focus on reproducing what has been lost , but on equipping the country’s scientific enterprise to meet common 21st century challenges — such as preparing for future pandemics, tackling climate change, and sharing the benefits of science fairly and equitably.

jack.grove@timeshighereducation.com

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